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Putnam Daily Voice serves Brewster, Carmel-Kent, Cold Spring, Mahopac, Patterson & Putnam Valley
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Get Your Cameras Ready, Putnam, For Record-Breaking Supermoon

A photo of the 'super blood moon' from 2015.
A photo of the 'super blood moon' from 2015. Photo Credit: Skip Pearlman
Shooting photos of the moon may not be as complicated as you think.
Shooting photos of the moon may not be as complicated as you think. Photo Credit: Skip Pearlman

Expect to see a 'Supermoon' of epic proportions this month, on the eve of Monday, Nov. 14 to be exact, with the full moon appearing to be the largest seen in skies since 1948.

The month will also bring meteor displays, and planets aligning in dazzling fashion. But the most impressive will be the largest "supermoon" seen in nearly seven decades.

The second of three 'supermoons' (we also had one in October, and the third will appear in December) - when the full moon makes a close approach to Earth - will rise in the east after sunset on Nov. 14.

This will be the largest of the three 'supermoons,' so photographers will want to have cameras ready.

Daily Voice has a few tips for those hoping to grab some impressive photographs.

First and most important is to have a tripod, and some type of telephoto lens. When photographing the moon, understand that it's brighter than you think. You don't need a very high ISO, or a very low shutter speed to get good photos.

Experimenting is the name of the game here - take a few shots, and adjust. Photos will probably be too bright, with no detail of the moon's surface. You'll want to adjust your settings until you start to see detail in the surface.

Using a low ISO number will keep noise levels low, and a high shutter speed will help avoid camera shake and fuzzy images.

Remember that when the moon is at its lowest point relative to the horizon - closest to the horizon - that's when it appears the largest.

Another photographer's trick to make the moon appear larger is to frame it behind a building or a large object - while it is low and close to the horizon - from a distant vantage point.

This method, depending on how long the lens you are  using and how well you execute, can yield very impressive results.

Again, it's about trial and error. Experiment and make adjustments, and you'll find the method that works best for you.

Look for our photos of the November 'supermoon,' and be sure to share your photos with us and our readers on Facebook.

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